Friday, April 15, 2011

Earth Day Campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 34

We continue today with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 190,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011 page.

Reason no. 34:
I say, plant a tree and grow a child. Many adults will remember wandering their neighborhood as children, grazing on any fruit that hung over the sidewalks. But perhaps fruit trees are too messy for the front yards of newer subdivisions. Ornamentals are planted along sidewalks instead. Now, there is nothing for the children to graze upon, and it is one more reason why children stay indoors and play video games. Let's line all our streets with fruit trees, and see if we can lure the children back outside. -Thomas J. Elpel, Author of Botany in a Day.

Thank you Thomas for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your books!

Thomas, just like all the other readers whose replies we'll publish, is winning one of the great 41 prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf and The Healthy Home by Dave Wentz and Dr. Myron Wentz. You can see the full list of the prizes on our earth day campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book Knitting Green: Conversations and Planet Friendly Projects by Ann Budd.

Knitting Green: Conversations and Planet Friendly Projects by Ann Budd - Detailing a wide range of perspectives and approaches to environmental issues, this unique crafting manual offers ideas for knitting conscientiously. Leading figures of the industry, from designers to yarn company executives, share their methods for integrating green principles into their work and lives—selecting organic products, facilitating an alternative to chemical detergent, recycling old projects, reducing disposable plastic bags, and creating pieces that provide warmth and save on energy.

Inventive and timely, this practical guidebook explains answers to important questions such as
What makes a yarn organic? and Are natural dyes safer than chemical dyes? Providing 22 clever designs for earth-friendly garments, accessories, gifts, and home furnishings, craft enthusiasts of all skill levels will enjoy projects that balance the altruism of saving the planet with the joyful benefits of their favorite hobby.

Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Barnes & Noble Bankruptcy Index: This week's index update is postponed to Sunday

I'm sorry for the delay, but our weekly update of our B&N bankruptcy index will be published only on Sunday, April 17.

In the meantime, I want to share with you something I just got on the email from B&N - maybe they're not adopting a green strategy yet, but at least they haven't forgot about Earth Day..

Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Working to green the book industry!