Thursday, March 31, 2011

Earth Day Campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 19

We continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011page.

Reason no. 19:
Quite simple Рto try to make up for some of the environmental impact we make when producing printed books - Marie Halkjær, Founder and Publisher at Clockwise, a Danish publishing company.

Thank you Marie for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your books!

We want to mention again the great prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf and The Healthy Home by Dave Wentz and Dr. Myron Wentz. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
This is Our World by Emily Sollinger.

This is Our World by Emily Sollinger - Join the fun on this interactive journey while learning to clean the air, reduce pollution, recycle, and more. Nine double-sided puzzle pieces are included in this book so kids can create two different puzzles!

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to info@ecolibris.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Barnes & Noble Bankruptcy Index: The stock is finally going up but B&N continues to go down

Unfortunately we still don't have any good news. This week our B&N bankruptcy index is showing bankruptcy is getting closer even though it made some gains at the stock market. Just a short reminder - As Borders filed for bankruptcy, we look at Barnes & Noble, the nation's largest book chain to see if they will follow Borders and also go into bankruptcy and if so, when exactly.

To do it more analytically we launched few weeks ago a new B&N Bankruptcy Index, which is based on 10 parameters, which receive a grade between 1-10 (1 - worst grade, 10 - best grade). Hence we receive a 0-100 point index scale, which we divide into several ranges as follows:

90-100: B&N is in an excellent shape. Couldn't be better!
80-89: B&N is doing great. Bankruptcy is no longer a real threat.
70-79: B&N could do better and has to be cautious of bankruptcy.
60-69: B&N doesn't look too good and bankruptcy is becoming a more realistic threat.

50-59: Bankruptcy is a clear and present danger.
49 and less: Red alert! Bankruptcy is just around the corner and is likely to happen within a short time frame.


We will check the
B&N Bankruptcy Index every Thursday, updating each one of the parameters included in the index and will analyze the trend. You can follow the weekly changes in the index from the day it was launched on the Barnes and Noble Bankruptcy Index page on our website.

So here's our update for this week (in brackets is last week's grade):

1. Confidence of the stock market in B&N

This parameter will look at the performan
ce of the B&N stock (symbol: BKS) in the last week. The performance of B&N's stock is an indication of the confidence the market has in the ability of B&N to maintain a viable business.

So let's look at last week's figures:


3/23: $9.10
3/30: $9.75
Change: +7.1%


As you can see, B&N's stock finally stopped falling down and went up 7.1%. Just for comparison, Amazon went up 8.5% last week and the S&P500 Index also gained 2.4%.

Still, some analysts like NakedValue suggested investors to wait for a better opportunity, which means he doesn't think we saw the bottom yet:

Not much has gone right for Barnes & Noble (BKS) shareholders recently so maybe we should celebrate the recent strong move in the stock price. But while I believe there is upside to the stock price at these levels, I would urge others to wait for a better opportunity to initiate or add to their positions.

Here's a technical analysis published yesterday by ABR-Seven Summits Research:

Barnes and Noble (NYSE:BKS) closed Tuesday's bullish trading session at $9.72. In the past year, the stock has hit a 52-week low of $8.75 and 52-week high of $24.47. Barnes and Noble stock has been showing support around $9.27 and resistance in the $10.11 range. Technical indicators for the stock are Bearish and S&P gives BKS a neutral 3 STARS (out of 5) hold rating.

For a hedged play on this stock, look at the Oct '11 $9.00 covered call for a net debit in the $8.12 area. That is also the break-even stock price for this trade. This covered call has a duration of 206 days, provides 16.46% downside protection and an assigned return rate of 10.84% for an annualized return rate of 19.20% (for comparison purposes only). Barnes and Noble does not pay dividends at this time.

So even though B&N has a relatively strong week on the market, we're still cautious and wait for another week to see if the stock keeps going up or falls down again. This week's grade for this parameter stays the same: 4.5 (4.5)

2. What analysts say on B&N

Morgan Stanley analyst Scott Devitt raised his price target on Amazon from $205 to $225 — one of the highest targets on Wall Street for the stock, which has jumped more than 10% in value over the past two weeks, but remains below its all-time peak above the $191 mark from mid-January.

“We believe the market is underestimating the positive share shift from specialty retail to Amazon,” Devitt wrote in his report. In particular, he predicted that traditional retailers in both the books and electronics segments are likely to continue losing sales to the company.

Troubles at book sellers Borders Group Inc., which filed for bankruptcy protection last month and is closing 200 underperforming stores, and Barnes & Noble Inc. present a $6.7 billion opportunity for Amazon in this business, he wrote.

(MarketWatch, March 30)

As you can see, the negative sentiment is continuing this week, and therefore our grade is going down by half a point: 5.5 (6)

3. New strategy to regain sales in the brick and mortar stores
Just like Borders, B&N still doesn't have yet a clear and comprehensive strategy that will transform their brick and mortar stores from a liability back to an asset. This week's grade stays the same: 4 (4)

4. What B&N is saying about itself
No updates here. This week's grade for this parameter stays the same: 6 (6)

5. Steps B&N is taking
As part of its effort to expand the offerings on its Nook Color e-reader, B&N also announced its April More In Store content, which will allow customers to connect to free in-store WiFi service and access exclusive essays, short stories and more. This week's grade stays the same: 6 (6)

6. Competitors
This parameter will mainly look into Borders and how its problems affect B&N.
This week the main news was on Borders' plan to hand out $8.3 million in bonuses, which I believe makes many customers (and employees) angry and disappointed. I think this week's news is providing an opportunity for B&N to show they're different and treat their stakeholders better than Borders, but they still need to act first and show they take advantage of this opportunity, so in the meantime, our grade stays the same: 5 (5)

7. Financial strength

Couple of weeks ago Barnes & Noble published the results for the third quarter. One interesting detail I learned this week from NakedValue was that B&N has a "flexible lease schedule, unlike Borders which was largely driven to bankruptcy because more than 70% of their store leases expired after 2017."

Other than that we don't have any updates this week and our grade stays the same: 7 (7)

8. Strength of the digital business

Barnes & Noble announced it is expanding Nook Color content with more books, magazines and children's books.

“With more than two million digital titles to browse, download and enjoy in seconds, NOOK Color customers repeatedly tell us how much they appreciate the ability to virtually turn the page on their favorite monthly, dive into a bestseller, and bring story time to life for their children – all using one device. And as always, Barnes & Noble will keep making NOOK Color better with new titles and featured enhancements for the best-in-class reading,” said Jamie Iannone, President of Digital Products for Barnes & Noble, in a written statement.

This week's grade stays the same: 8 (8)

9. Sense of urgency
It looks like B&N still think they have time and are not worried at all, or at least not worried enough to begin doing something with their brick and mortar stores (again, we don't believe more toys in the stores and extra room for the Nook is a winning strategy). If we can learn something from the Borders' case, it's how fast things go bad when your reach a certain tipping point of financial distress or distrust of your stakeholders (consumers or publishers for example). This week's grade stays the same: 5.5 (5.5)

10. General feeling
This parameter will be an indication of our impression of all the materials read and analyzed for this index. Our feeling this week is that things are still not looking too good for B&N.
This week's grade stays the same: 5.5 (5.5)

This week's Barnes & Noble Bankruptcy Index: 57 points (57.5)

As you can see, this week's index is set at 57 points, which means B&N is getting deeper into the 50-59 zone: Bankruptcy is a clear and present danger. It's still not the red zone but it means that bankruptcy is getting closer and is becoming a real threat to B&N. See you next Thursday.

To view the weekly changes in the index visit Barnes and Noble Bankruptcy Index on our website.

You can find more resources on the future of bookstores on our website at www.ecolibris.net/bookstores_future.asp

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Working to green the book industry!

Earth Day 2011 - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 18

This reason was supposed to go online yesterday but due to technical problems it's on today, as we continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011page.

Reason no. 18:
We should all plant a tree for our book because most people still enjoy the feeling of an actual page turning book in their hands. If we don't replenish and keep creating new books, we'll run out of this precious resource - Susan Newman (who also designed the campaign's logo!)

Thank you Susan for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your books!

Susan, just like all the other readers whose replies we'll publish, is winning one of the great 41 prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf, Menu Dating by Tristan Coopersmith and The Healthy Home by Dave Wentz and Dr. Myron Wentz. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
Easy to Be Green by Ellie O'Ryan, which is part of Simon & Schuster's Little Green Books.

Easy to Be Green by Ellie O'Ryan - Everyone's talking about the environment these days, especially kids. But what can kids do? A lot! This book is filled with cool coloring pages, Earth-saving tips, fun facts, and easy activities kids can do to help the environment. It's just what kids need to be green all by themselves!

This coloring and activity book will be printed on 100% post-consumer waste recycled paper with soy-ink. The paper is FSC certified.

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to
info@ecolibris.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Looking for great green ebooks? Here's our weekly list of 10 recommended green ebooks!

We write here extensively on the ongoing dilemma of how green e-books are. Even though we believe e-reading can get greener, we can't ignore the growing popularity of ebooks (and you know I am fond of my Kindle..) and we want to help those of you who look to read interesting ebooks on green topics.

Therefore, we started last week a weekly series of 10 recommendations on green ebooks that we either read or read about on Treehugger, Grist and other websites we follow. Most of them are new and were either released in the last month or two or about to be released (but already available as ebooks).

The links of these ebooks are to Amazon.com and I apologize in advance to all the Nook, iPad, Kobo and Sony Reader owners. I hope you can easily find an ebook you'll like on other ebookstores. This is also the place to disclose that we're taking part in Amazon's affiliate program and therefore will receive a small percentage of every purchase made using these links. We hope you don't mind!


A new list is posted here every Wednesday and you can find all the lists published so far on our recommended green ebooks webpage.

Without further ado, here's this week's list of 10 recommended green e-books:

1. Climate Capitalism: Capitalism in the Age of Climate Change by Hunter Lovins and Boyd Cohen - Hill and Wang (April 12, 2011)

2. Converting To An Energy Efficient Home: A Guide For Beginners by Randall Graham - Amazon Kindle Services (March 21, 2011)

3. The Young Activist's Guide to Building a Green Movement and Changing the Worldby Sharon Smith - Ten Speed Press (February 22, 2011)

4. The Best Place for Garbage by Sandra Weise - WiR Press (March 20, 2011)

5. The City Homesteader: Self-Sufficiency on Any Square Footage by Scott Meyer - Running Press (April 26, 2011)

6. Retrofitting Suburbia, Updated Edition: Urban Design Solutions for Redesigning Suburbs by Ellen Dunham-Jones and June Williamson - Wiley (March 23, 2011)

7. Surviving the Apocalypse in the Suburbs: The Thrivalist's Guide to Life Without Oil by Wendy Brown- New Society Publishers (April 1, 2011)

8. Powering the Dream: The History and Promise of Green Technology by Alexis Madrigal - Da Capo Press (March 29, 2011)

9. Guide To Organic Gardening - Make Your Own Vegetable Garden by Juanita Ringer - Amazon Digital Services (March 2011)

10. Feeding Your Family in a Fried Economy (Unshackled UnChef) by Denise Hansen - KioMio, LLC; 1 edition (March 9, 2011)

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Earth Day 2011 - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 17

We continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011page.

Reason no. 17:
Cynics call books dead trees. Planting a tree for every book brings the book back to life, several times over. It closes the loop of the publishing cycle by replenishing its principal resource. Optimists say, "Books can be live trees." - Peter Korchnak, Founder and CEO, GoodBookery and co-editor of The Portland Bottom Line: Practices for Your Small Business from America's Hotbed of Sustainability

Thank you Peter for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your books!

We want to mention again the great prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf, Menu Dating by Tristan Coopersmith and The Healthy Home by Dave Wentz and Dr. Myron Wentz. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
Knitting Green: Conversations and Planet Friendly Projects by Ann Budd.

Knitting Green: Conversations and Planet Friendly Projects by Ann Budd - Detailing a wide range of perspectives and approaches to environmental issues, this unique crafting manual offers ideas for knitting conscientiously. Leading figures of the industry, from designers to yarn company executives, share their methods for integrating green principles into their work and lives—selecting organic products, facilitating an alternative to chemical detergent, recycling old projects, reducing disposable plastic bags, and creating pieces that provide warmth and save on energy.

Inventive and timely, this practical guidebook explains answers to important questions such as
What makes a yarn organic? and Are natural dyes safer than chemical dyes? Providing 22 clever designs for earth-friendly garments, accessories, gifts, and home furnishings, craft enthusiasts of all skill levels will enjoy projects that balance the altruism of saving the planet with the joyful benefits of their favorite hobby.

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to
info@ecolibris.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Stakeholders Unite! Tell Borders to stop the $8.3 million executive bonus plan!

I was happy to see yesterday that I'm not the only one who think that Borders' plan to hand out $8.3 million in bonuses is outrageous. It looks like Borders is taking care of its executives and forgetting that it also has stakeholders that are no less important to its future recovery.

But it doesn't have to be this way.

If you're OK with the bonuses that's fine, but if you think that this is wrongdoing, it's time to voice your concerns and tell Borders - Stop the bonuses! If many readers, authors and publishers will do it, Borders hopefully won't be able to ignore it and will have to rethink about it. And if Borders won't think it needs to take into consideration its shareholders, maybe the Honorable Martin Glenn who will review the bonus proposal will take it consideration.


Just as a reminder what we're protesting about:


Borders is seeking to hand out $8.3 million in executive bonuses, including nearly $1.7 million to President Mike Edwards. As the Wall Street Journal mentioned these bonuses are tied "to an "aggressive" time frame for exiting Chapter 11. The bonuses won't be paid if Borders liquidates"


Who will get them?

According to the WSJ "Seventeen top executives are covered by the largest program, which could add as much as $7.1 million to the pay packets of leaders who stick with the company in bankruptcy.Court papers say 70% of the group have been with the company less than 18 months, and many joined Borders less than a year ago.A second $1.2 million bonus program covers 25 "director-level" managers "critical to the debtors' reorganization and to ongoing business," court papers say."

Why we think it's wrong?

1. Morality: There's something immoral in rewarding executives if they manage to pull the company out of bankruptcy, when these are the same people that had a significant part in getting the company there in the first place. If you want to learn more on how Borders got into bankruptcy just read the excellent piece, 'Why is Barnes and Noble performing well as a business while Borders has filed for bankruptcy?' by Mark Evans, former Borders merchandising strategy & analytics director.

2. Fairness: Does it look fair to you that "For Borders' five highest-level executives, the bonuses would mean extra pay of between 90% and 150% of their base salaries, depending on how quickly the company exits bankruptcy or is sold as a going concern" (WSJ), while hundreds of employees of Borders lost their jobs in the last couple of months, many of them after many years of dedicated work for the company?

3. Stakeholders come second - The bonus plan has a clear message: Borders' executives are more important than its stakeholders, including the publishers that Borders owe so much money. Here's just a reminder of the debt we talk about - Penguin Group (USA) - $41.1 million
Hachette - $36.9 million, Simon & Schuster - $33.8 million, Random House- $33.5 million,
HarperCollins - $25.8 million.

4. Business as usual thinking - Instead of giving an example in tough times and providing customers, employees, publishers and other stakeholders with the confidence that Borders is doing business differently this bonus plan is an evidence that it's business as usual at Borders. Yes, I know there were no such incentives in 2010 and that Borders didn’t allow pay raises for the last four years, but hey, aren't you in debt of $1.29 billion? Is this the way you want to recover and compete on readers?

What you can do to tell Borders to stop its plans to pay these bonuses?

1. Share the story (check also here and here) with your friends.

2. Tweet about it with the hashtag #stopthebonuses

3. Call the Borders Customer Care Center at 800.770.7811 and raise your concerns over Borders' bonus plan.

4. Call (877-906-7675) or email (Bordersinfo@gcginc.com) the Garden City Group, Inc., the Noticing and Claims Agent in this case and raise your concerns over the bonus plan.

You can find more information and updates on the future of Borders after bankruptcy at www.ecolibris.net/borders.asp

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Monday, March 28, 2011

Earth Day Campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 16

We continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011page.

Reason no
. 16:

I strive to personally live by this old fashioned rule: When I bring a new item into my home, I try to donate a gently used item to someone in need. The same principle can be applied to books. Every time you bring a new book into your home, make sure to donate dollars so a new tree may be planted to replace the tree that was used to manufacture the pages of the book. Easy! -Laura Theodore, The Jazzy Vegetarian and author of the book "Vegetarian Cooking for Every Day"


Thank you Laura for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your books!

We want to mention again the great prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf, Menu Dating by Tristan Coopersmith and The Healthy Home by Dave Wentz and Dr. Myron Wentz. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.


Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food by Paul Greenberg.

Four Fish: The Future of the Last Wild Food by Paul Greenberg - Our relationship with the ocean is undergoing a profound transformation. Whereas just three decades ago nearly everything we ate from the sea was wild, rampant overfishing combined with an unprecedented bio-tech revolution has brought us to a point where wild and farmed fish occupy equal parts of a complex and confusing marketplace. We stand at the edge of a cataclysm; there is a distinct possibility that our children's children will never eat a wild fish that has swum freely in the sea.

In Four Fish, award-winning writer and lifelong fisherman Paul Greenberg takes us on a culinary journey, exploring the history of the fish that dominate our menus---salmon, sea bass, cod and tuna-and examining where each stands at this critical moment in time. He visits Norwegian mega farms that use genetic techniques once pioneered on sheep to grow millions of pounds of salmon a year. He travels to the ancestral river of the Yupik Eskimos to see the only Fair Trade certified fishing company in the world. He investigates the way PCBs and mercury find their way into seafood; discovers how Mediterranean sea bass went global; Challenges the author of Cod to taste the difference between a farmed and a wild cod; and almost sinks to the bottom of the South Pacific while searching for an alternative to endangered bluefin tuna.

Fish, Greenberg reveals, are the last truly wild food - for now. By examining the forces that get fish to our dinner tables, he shows how we can start to heal the oceans and fight for a world where healthy and sustainable seafood is the rule rather than the exception.

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to info@ecolibris.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Doesn't it make you mad to hear that Borders wants to pay $8.3 million in bonuses to the same executives that got it into trouble?

I know it makes me mad.

The Wall Street Journal reported on Saturday that Borders "is seeking bankruptcy court approval to hand out as much as $8.3 million in executive bonuses, including nearly $1.7 million to President Mike Edwards."

Who will get the bonuses? "A number of key members of the management team have been put in place or in their positions within the last year. This management team has been fully focused on repositioning Borders to have the potential to be successful for the long term," said company spokeswoman Mary Davis.

According to the WSJ "Seventeen top executives are covered by the largest program, which could add as much as $7.1 million to the pay packets of leaders who stick with the company in bankruptcy. Court papers say 70% of the group have been with the company less than 18 months, and many joined Borders less than a year ago. A second $1.2 million bonus program covers 25 "director-level" managers "critical to the debtors' reorganization and to ongoing business," court papers say"

Makes sense? Not to me. Why should the same executives who brought Borders to bankruptcy get rewarded? I understand that the executives play an important role in the recovery of Borders, but didn't they also play an important role in its failure?

What's the incentive to succeed when you get your bonus anyway? And does it seem appropriate to these executives to receive these bonuses while more than 200 stores are closed and so many employees at Borders are losing now their jobs?

On UPI.com, Industry analysts Michael Norris is quoted saying that "retaining key staff members was an important goal. Concerning bonus pay, "If it keeps their best people from heading to the exits, a retention bonus is a great idea," Norris said."

Well, I have to say to Norris that if these are the best people Borders have they're in trouble. And second, maybe these executives will stay, but what about all the customers that won't think it's such a great idea and will prefer to buy in bookstores where fairness and sensibility play a greater role??

What do you think? I'll be happy to hear your thoughts.

You can find more news and updates on the future of Borders following their bankruptcy at www.ecolibris.net/borders.asp

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!


Sunday, March 27, 2011

Earth Day 2011 - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 15

We continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.

So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day 2011page.

Reason n
o. 15:

plant a tree for a book for the obvious reason of using paper but also because a book can be like a seed that sprouts an idea and who knows how big it will eventually get if left to flourish. I still want you to buy a book. - Karen

Thank you Karen for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your book!

Karen, just like a
ll the other readers whose replies we'll publish, is winning one of the great prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like The Last Original Idea by Alan K'necht and Geri Rockstein, Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf, and The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard.

The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard - Americans have way too much Stuff , and way too much of it is toxic. Thats the message Annie Leonard has been spreading ever since her college days, and most recently in her short Internet film The Story of Stuff, which has been viewed by over 12 million people. But the film is only the tip of the iceberg.

This astonishing, inspiring book takes her message to an even higher level. In it she outlines the perils of overconsumption as she traces products back to their sources, through their life spans, and forward into their disposal. The Story of Stuff works on all levels as it brings together information on the environment, the economy, and cultures around the world.

With her trademark compassion, curiosity, and playfulness, Leonard gives firsthand accounts of sneaking into dumps and factories around the world; chronicles the lives of Haitian textile workers and Congolese kids working in deadly mines; shows how our health and well-being are compromised by neurotoxins in our pillows and lead in our childrens lunch boxes; and most important, tells us that this is not the way things have to be. She presents concrete steps for taking action that point the way toward saving our health, our communities, and the planet.

From high school kids to their parents in the suburbs, from government officials to people working in corporations, schools, and churches, The Story of Stuff is a life-changing book. Like Rachel Carsons Silent Spring, it will transform the way you think and act.

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to info@ecolibris.net. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book: Reason no. 14

We continue with our Earth Day campaign - 41 Reasons to Plant a Tree for Your Book, where we share with you 41 reasons provided by readers in celebration of the upcoming 41st anniversary of Earth Day!

With more than 180,000 trees planted so far on behalf of readers, authors and publishers working with Eco-Libris, it's no surprise that we think planting trees to green up books is a great idea.. But we also want to hear what readers think about it and why they believe planting trees for their books is a good idea.
So for 41 days until Earth Day, we publish here the 41 best replies we receive, one reply a day. All replies are gathered and presented on the Earth Day campaign's page.

Reason no. 14:

Plant a tree for a book so that future generations of creative writers will have something in which to marvel.- Lauren

Thank you Lauren for sharing with us your thoughts on planting trees for your book!

Lauren, just like a
ll the other readers whose replies we'll publish, is winning one of the great prizes we give away on this campaign, courtesy of our partners. Winners can choose their prize from a great list of gifts including audiobooks from Simon & Schuster Audio (such as The Half Life by Jennifer Weiner, Left Neglected by Lisa Genova and Essence of Happiness by the Dalai Lama) and great books, like The Last Original Idea by Alan K'necht and Geri Rockstein, Planet Home by Jeffrey Hollender, Spit That Out! by Paige Wolf, and The Story of Stuff by Annie Leonard. You can see the full list of the prizes on the campaign's page.

Every day we'll give further details on one of the prizes. Today we present you with the book
The Last Original Idea by Alan K'necht and Geri Rockstein.

The Last Original Idea: A Cynic's View of Internet Marketing by Alan K'necht and Geri Rockstein - The Last Original Idea – A Cynics View of Internet Marketing is a light hearted look at the state of Internet marketing today and traces back each of the elements to its historical roots, clearly demonstrating that companies who understood the mistakes of the past were able to be profitable in the present. Others are a mere memory, lost in cyber-space.

"Wisdom is about context. The Last Original Idea is a chronicle of communication and commerce as seen through the lens of the Internet. It is a must-have reference book for marketing people - if only to get a handle on all of those allusions you've heard, but can't quite place. This book puts the whole Internet phenomenon into perspective, takes the Gee-Whiz right out of it and leaves you with a view point tempered by time and seasoned with history. Just the thing for those who are rightfully fearful of repeating history." - Jim Sterne, Founder of the eMetrics Marketing Optimization Summit and the Web Analytics Association.

We still have some spots available so please send us your reply to info@ecolibris.net
. We look forward to hearing from you.

Yours,
Raz @ Eco-Libris

Eco-Libris: Promoting sustainable reading!